New edition of ‘Ethiek en economie, een grensoverschrijdende inleiding’.

I am more than thrilled to announce the publication of the second edition of ‘Ethiek en economie, een grensoverschrijdende inleiding’ at Noordhoff Publishers. The initial version of 2015 had an English follow up in 2018. Now, the Dutch book is completely revised and updated (2020). The book consists of three parts:

1) ethics and the individual: focussing on morality, responsibility, normative ethics, and moral decision making-processes;

2) ethics and the business: focussing on the triple bottom line and accountability (integrated reporting);

3) ethics and the world: focussing on cultural diversity and globalization.

In all chapters, practical examples can be found that are business oriented. There is also a website with addiotional course materials and weblectures. For more info, click here.

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Son of a bitch! – Virtue in politics (and the role of the media)

detarte

Recently, the headlines of the news have been dominated by all kinds of remarkable details regarding our politicians. However, they usually are not about the political ideas of the politicians or the party they represent, but rather about funny details and edgy characteristics. For instance, why is it so important that Hillary Clinton’s best friend was in a relation with a pervert? And why does Donald Trump keep emphasizing how successful and rich he is as a businessman? And why is the sexual orientation of the Dutch President more important than his liberal ideas on business? And how come that the news regarding the latest AESEAN summit was dominated by a silly remark of the President of the Philippines on Barack Obama, instead of the more pressing issues such as climate change and North Korea’s latest nuclear tests?

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The case of open trade – and why it is such a good idea

Open trade good idea

Free trade is a heatedly debated issue in politics and the media. The political sensitivity of the topic creates a maelstrom of arguments in favour and against open trade, in which statistics and arguments are thrown around without much second guessing or academic underpinning. Depending on the political colour of your newspaper, the media will choose to show you the pro’s or con’s of open trade. This even possibly results in the queer situation that
two newspapers (The Economist and The Guardian, on the 4th of January 2014) draw completely different conclusions on the functioning of the NAFTA on exactly the same date. While all this arguing and reasoning may have at the core some truth in it, I think we need to step back a bit to truly consider the real benefits of open trade.

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The case of open trade – and why it is such a bad idea

Open trade bad idea

Free trade is a heatedly debated issue in politics and the media. Those who oppose the idea of open trade between countries usually come up with the argument that comes down to something like this: ‘as a result of open borders, we lose jobs to those foreigners, and our factories are relocated elsewhere’. The suggested remedy is then that if borders are closed by upholding trade barriers, the jobs will come back, and the factories remain. Another often heard complaint is that so called regulatory competition will lead to a downward spiral: countries with the most flexible rules on product standards, labour regulations or environmental issues will attract most companies and be successful as a result of open trade.

As simple, safe and convenient as it sounds, such arguments are hardly convincing.

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